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Accueil > Membres > Les membres > Annuaire

Zingbagba Mark

Research interests

  • Vertical relationships
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Agricultural Economics

Contacts : zingbagba@gate.cnrs.fr ;mark.zingbagba@univ-st-etienne.fr

Dissertation
Three essays on upstream and downstream disruptions along nutritional high-value food supply chains in emerging countries

Supervisors
Muriel Fadairo and Maria Sylvia Macchione Saes

Education

  • PhD Candidate in Economics, University of Lyon, GATE-CNRS (2015-)
  • Master in Game Theory, Experimental Economics and Applied Econometrics, University of Saint-Etienne (2015)
  • Master in International Relations, University of Saint-Etienne (2015)
  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics with Geography and Resource Development, University of Ghana (2009)

Work in Progress :
Upstream and downstream disruptions along the food supply chain in emerging countries : the case of unprocessed nutritional high-value foods

Income and growth dynamics in emerging countries since the turn of the millennium have seen an important change in the pattern of food consumption in these countries. There is an increasing share of nutritional high-value foods in household food consumption expenditure. These are foods with high nutritional value per calorie or per kilogramme, and although may be exported, are also consumed by households.

The increased consumption of these foods implies that a disruption of their supply chains has potential implications for the attainment of food security in these countries, since disruptions affect both the availability and use of food along the chain. The effects of food supply chain disruptions can be particularly significant along the supply chain of unprocessed nutritional high-value foods, since these foods tend to be highly perishable. Additionally, though supply chain disruptions tend to have ramifications for the entire chain, the magnitude of effect could differ upstream and downstream. This difference should inform both policy formulation and business strategies along the chain.

In view of the rising share of nutritional high-value foods in household food consumption in emerging countries and the implications of food supply chain disruptions for the attainment of food security in these countries, this study assesses how natural disasters (climatological, hydrological and geophysical) and structural bottlenecks differently affect upstream and downstream sections of the unprocessed nutritional high-value food supply chain in emerging countries. The unprocessed foods under study include meat, eggs, fruits and vegetables.

Conferences and Presentations

  • Center for Organisation Studies (CORS) seminar, University of São Paulo, June 2017, São Paulo, Brazil (link)
  • Economics and Management Doctoral School Lecture Series, May 2017, Lyon, France
  • International Workshop on Franchising and Distribution Networks in Emerging Countries, May 2016, Saint-Etienne, France (link)
  • Economics and Management Doctoral School Lecture Series, January 2015, Lyon, France

Others :

  • Member of organising committee, International Workshop on Franchising and Distribution Networks in Emerging Countries, May 2016, Saint-Etienne, France (link)
  • Member, Students’ Representative Council, Economics and Management Doctoral School, University of Lyon, France (2016-)
  • In charge of operating video conferencing system at GATE Saint-Etienne (2016-)